Is The Private Student Loan Market As Bad As It Seems?

Seven private lenders — Discover Bank, The First Marblehead Corporation, PNC Bank, RBS Citizens, Sallie Mae, SunTrust Banks, Inc., and Wells Fargo Bank — provided data to MeasureOne for the report. The private student loan market, which boomed in the years leading up to the financial crisis, typically doesn’t offer the same consumer protections as the federal student loan market, and has drawn harsh criticism from student advocacy groups and government agencies. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has zeroed in on consumer complaints that detail borrowers’ expressed inability to repay their private loans. Unlike federal loans, private loans typically don’t have income-based repayment plans, and are more difficult, if not impossible to refinance. Thousands of borrowers have submitted complaints — according to the CFPB’s second annual report on private student loan processing related to problems with payment processing, especially when borrowers needed to adjust their repayment terms during financial hardship. Many frustrated borrowers have also complained about breakdowns in communication with their private lenders and servicers, especially if their loans are transferred between servicers.
Source: http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/12/23/is-the-private-student-loan-market-as-bad-as-it-seems

Politicians: Ignore the Millennial Student Loan Crisis at Your Own Risk

Additionally, the Class of 2012 had an average debt of $29,400. Each year from 2008 to 2012, this report found that the average debt of federal and private loans combined increased 6 percent each year. These figures were drawn from data voluntarily provided by 1,075 public four-year and four-year private nonprofit institutions. Although TICAS contacted for-profit colleges which accounted for seven percent of 2012 bachelors recipients, none chose to share their data. The lack of this additional data may have contributed to understating the scope and volume of the nations student loan debt, now estimated to be $1.1 trillion.
Source: http://washingtoninformer.com/news/2013/dec/23/student-loan-bill-of-rights/

Student Loan Bill of Rights

Their approval of President Obama is near an all-time low, their approval ratings of Congressional Democrats and Republicans is close to zero and almost half of them (49 percent) think this country is headed in the wrong direction. A majority of them would recall the entire Congress — and 45 percent of them would recall their own representatives. Although the impression of many people in my age bracket is that all young people these days are liberal, that’s not true: 37 percent of them self-identify as conservative or leaning conservative compared to the 33 percent that identify as liberals. The only good news for Democrats is that 33 percent of millennials identify with the Democratic party mirroring the percentage of self-identified liberals but only 24 percent identify as Republican. Democrats might not have to worry (yet) about losing liberal millennials’ affections, but Republicans seemingly already have.
Source: http://abcnews.go.com/Business/politicians-ignore-millennial-student-loan-crisis/story?id=21195661

Student loan deal passes Senate

today Dear Steve, My wages are being garnished for overdue student loans. Its been going on for a few years. I already declared bankruptcy about 6 years ago but of course that doesn’t impact student loans. I am just wondering if there is any way to move to making voluntary and automatic monthly payments in replace of the garnishment to repay a student loan? Tiffany Click here to get my free my weekday email newsletter with the latest tips and advice on how to beat debt and do better financially.
Source: http://www.wral.com/can-i-stop-my-garnishment-for-my-student-loans-/13247368/

Can I Stop My Garnishment for student loan forgiveness for teachers My Student Loans?

WASHINGTON (CNNMoney) The Senate on Wednesday approved a bipartisan deal that ensures lower interest rates on loans for students heading to college this fall. Senators voted 81 to 18 to lower interest rates for undergraduates taking out government loans this school year to 3.86% — cheaper than the 6.8% interest rate that kicked in on July 1. The new rates would be retroactive and apply to loans taken out after July 1. However, the bill has provisions for rates to go higher in coming years. It is expected to become law, with support from the White House and the House of Representatives, which will likely take up the bill in coming days.
Source: http://money.cnn.com/2013/07/24/news/economy/senate-student-loans/index.html

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s